Wood Availability

Firewood availability varies widely from region to region.
Click your area to see more detail and learn which fuel species are most readily available near you.

What you can expect to find:

Coastal communities in northwest Alaska will not generally have sufficient wood sources to heat with year round. However, institutional heat savings may be realized by shipping wood pellets or other processed wood material.

Schools, public facilities and large building managers may consider alternative heating methods similar to those detailed in the Municipal Heating case studies »

Individuals further inland may find adequate supplies of white Spruce, black Spruce and in some cases Birch, which has more BTU's per cord than Spruce, may also be available.

Alaska Forest Dominant Tree Species by Forest Class
(USGS Classified AVHRR, 1991)

Closed Broadleaf & Closed Mixed Forest

Black Cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa)
Balsam Poplar
Paper Birch
Quaking Aspen
White Spruce
Black Spruce

Closed Mixed Forest

Black Spruce (Picea mariana)
Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera)
White Spruce (Picea glauca)
Balsam Poplar (Populus balsamifera)

Closed Spruce Forest

White Spruce
Black Spruce

Spruce Woodland/Shrub

White Spruce

Open Spruce Forest/Shrub/Bog

White Spruce

Spruce & Broadleaf Forest

White Spruce
Black Spruce

Open Spruce & Closed Mixed Forest

White Spruce
Black Spruce
Paper Birch
Balsam Poplar
Quaking Aspen (Populus tremuloides)

Closed Spruce & Hemlock Forest

Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis)
Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla)
  • Woodland has 10 - 24% tree cover
  • Open forest has 25% - 59% tree cover
  • Closed forest has 60% - 100% tree cover
  • Mixed forest hs 25% - 75% of tree cover is broadleaf or conifer species